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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> very nice. >> all right. aside from that, we'll take a look at upbeat economic news out of china. the purchasing managers index rising to 50.9 in december. highest level since august. the surge also helped speculation the chinese government will take additional steps to support its economy. of the 15 times china's up 3%, since '09, s&p that day is up 13 times. almost every time. despite the futures today, is it a good omen for the markets here? >> look, there was a dichotomy in that government. there were people who were concerned about inflation. and there were people who said, listen, we're not growing fast enough. they do have a lot of levers. if they want to grow, i still -- i've been a bull on china. if they want to do 9%, 10%, they have the ability to do it. all they have to do is have a gigantic sewer infrastructure program. >> that's true. there's going to be an economic war conference held soon. it's believed the government will start to release growth forecast at that conference and perhaps unveil some further stimulus measures or tip their hat in terms of whether they
economies due to the european downturn and cooling ties with china. another negative factor is the drop in domestic car sales because state subsidies for buyers of fuel efficient cars expired in september. for the nonmanufacturing sector the sentiment index was down by four points from the previous surv survey. looking aahead the to the next three months, major manufacturers expect a slight improvement as they hope the u.s. and chinese economies recovery. they're concerned that cooling consumer sentiment will persist. japanese shoppers are spends less, and that's got retailers depress depressed. as tremendous to try get people to spend more some may fuel a price war. >> reporter: major supermarket chains have slashed t prices over the past three months on more than 350,000 products. >> translator: customers are become increasingly price conscious. we hope discounts on daily necessities will encourage them to visit more often and boost our sales. >> reporter: furniture manufacturers are opening a 10% to 40% discount on nearly 900 items. >> translator: consumer spending in the overall eco
. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had this number last week. reminds people, again, they've been right down, and up. mcdonald's is one of those things where joe asked me from squawk when we were talking, i said, i think this is a for real term. if they continue to innovate. i may this may not be your cup of tea, burger, but innovation s higher. >> they tried to sell it to consumers as opposed to their extra value menu, which is a little bit hi
up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. li
't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if this thing suddenly got off the rails. take a listen to mitch mcconnell last night talking about the pace of the negotiations here and the frustration that he's experienced going through all of this over the weekend. take a listen. >> now, i'm concerned about the lack of urgency here. like we all know we're running out of time. this is far too much at stake for political gamesmanship. we need to protect the american
.s. engineer who went to china and saw them building a dam. and china's o so interested in having jobs and job creation. and the u.s. engineer goes to china, and he sees them building a dam, and they're all using shovels. and the engineer asks the chinese engineer, why are they using shovels? why don't you have them use modern equipment? we're trying to create jobs. and so the british -- engineer says why don't you give them spoons? [laughter] all jobs are not the same. the idea that we somehow reduce spending or even if we reduce the growth of government spending which would be an important first step does not mean we're going to see retardation in growth levels. those people who actually do capital investment. so i've been arguing as kevin said on entitlement reform. the federal government spent $3.5 trillion last year. of that about 1.5 was social security, medicare and medicaid. three big government expenditure programs are about 45% of government expenditures. those are growing. in 2010 medicare and medicaid combined spent more than social security. social security is a $750 billion progr
to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go through, the country's child rights commissioner says that those kids are going to stay in russia. so why are the russians doing this? the ban is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed tw
reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the fait
obviously focus on is china. in september, they approved infrastructure projects. love the way the stocking is acting the last couple of days. dagen: you are bullish on the global economy. charles: for a while now. connell: you are not worried about china athol? charles: i think china is going to continue to be on a roll. i am also impressed with brazil, indonesia and turkey. the rest of the world really doing extraordinarily well. connell: we like when you go global on us, charles. what do you use, google maps or apple? charles: stuart varney is probably better than me when it comes to these smart phones. connell: i do remember when you got away from the flip phone. charles: that is only because i left it in the green room. i heard someone from the smithsonian came up. dagen: charles, thank you so much. connell: let's go to this google graphic story. it is a very popular app. let's put it that way. we will talk about that coming up. more from washington, the house speaker ready to put through his own legislation. >> our hope continues to be to reach an agreement with the president what we
vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. to keep the factories going. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker and kissinger initially, and then volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the rese
forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killin
tomorrow. >>> the world bank in the meantime is raising its 2013 economic growth forecast for china and for developing east asia. the organization says that the region remains resilient despite the lackluster performance of the global economy. the world bank sees china expanding by 8.4% next year. it's expecting that it will be fueled by fiscal stimulus and the faster implementation of large investment projects. today's forecast is higher than an earlier one that was sited in a world bank report in october. 8.4%, not bad both if you can get it. >>> speaking of china, the united states is moving forward with plans to slap steep anti-dumping duties on wind turbine towers that are imported from china at prices that are deemed unfairly low. the news from the commerce department comes as u.s. officials welcomed a high-level chinese delegation for trade and economic talks. the u.s. trade panel has final approval over the duties and is expected to vote on the case in late january. >>> in corporate news, ubs hit with a $1.5 million fine today. that will add up, a few more of those. the swis
china, southeast asia or from as far as the u.s., norway, etcetera in buying korean won bonds and most likely these are from the sector due to their diversification needs and attracted by the korean bond markets. and if you look at the yields, although it has already come lower quite a lot, but if you compared that with treasury yields, that is very attractive. >> we'll leave it there. thank you very much. >>> now if you're just joining us here on "worldwide exchange," these are your headlines. a union at last. the eu finance ministers hand the ecb the power to supervisor more than 150 banks following another late nightmare thon session in brussels. the euro bounces on the news, but stocks in europe trade lower as ben bernanke warns monetary policy may not be enough to offset the damage if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the u.s. takes another surprising step tying interest rates to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors chairing danone plan to save $2 million over the next two years as they try to offset a slump in southern europe. >>> straight ahead on the progr
. china coming back. gm rationalizing europe. >> gm europe, when you say a couple quarters behind ford, are you saying progress in the quarterly financials? >> committed to rationalizing europe. >> again, a larger theme of excess capitalization at u.s. corporations, and the fact that so much money is sitting on balance sheets doing nothing. >> did you read oracle? how much money do they have. they bought back 10 billion worth of stock. these companies, you read through their stories, and you say, not only did they not extend themselves during this downturn, they conserved a lot of cash. by the way, humans did, too, in america. have you seen the numbers that the federal reserve put out last night about how much money is being -- how little debt is being taken down by citizens. we're back to levels of the '90s. federal household debt service came out last night. the percentage of disposable income is 14%, down to 10%. that's 1994 levels. >> that's a big part of morgan stanley's call on citi today. from overweight to equal weight. consumer deleveraging in their view coming to an end. and
their livelihoods when the factory across the street from us closes their doors in november, movinr,to china, taking around 170 jobs with them. >> the bain capital board has made their decision. the cdo has made his decision. -- ceo has made his decision. we believe the only person in the world who can stop these jobs from the move is mitt romney. >> in the latest sign of global warming, guys in the arctic has shrunk to its smallest area since record-keeping began. >> there are people who rely on the arctic ocean. if the ice melts, it is a scary thought. it is who we are, is where the animals migrate. my elders, the community elders rely on their vitamins, the traditional foods that the ocean supplies. >> i'm sorry, i will stop the subsidy to pbs and other things. i love big bird, i like you, too, but i'm not going to keep on spending money to borrow from china to pay for. >> labor protests against the largest private employer, walmart, is expanded to 28 stores in 12 states. organizers describe the action as the first retail workers' strike in walmart's history. >> i work in the warehouse in illinoi
can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude imports rose to the second highest daily rate on record. analysts say this is further evidence of the chinese recover. and i saw this story on -- every once in a while i check tweeting. >> i saw it on google, too. kayla tausche reporting -- >> kayla beat nick dunn. >> nick dunn was quoting kayla. >>
on the campaign trail the president talked about an unlimited credit card from china. i don't think that -- >> actually, mr. mcconnell proposed himself the idea with congress and the role of the debt ceiling. >> i think that's just crazy. >> ken, well let me ask you this. >> you should take that up with mitch mcconnell. >> you brought in the debt ceiling and that was something in the president's initial offer, this idea that we take the raising of the debt ceiling. we take that power away from congress. what's wrong with that? it would seem to a lot of folks that would be one way to avoid this seemingly constant threat of hijacking the government. >> put us on a very slippery slope towards the plight of greece and spain and others who basically don't have that check. this whole notion of unlimited credit card is just pure poppycock and it's something that only can be dreamed of as a fiscally responsible thing in washington, d.c. >> but, you know, you still have a process and procedure in terms of the budget where the president proposes a budget and congress is playing a much more si
in the world paying big in chin. in china, individuals cannot own any arms. we have the same kinds of violent situations going on. in connecticut they had some of the strongest gun-control laws in the country and it still occurred there. let's look at the problems that caused this to occur. let's focus on solving those problems instead of just saying it is guns. right now today in connecticut, also weapons -- an assault weapon is a machine gun. they are already controlled. someone cannot just go to the store and buy an assault weapon today. it is not about clips or number of rounds in a gun. we have to focus upon those problems that caused this young man to snap, to kill his mom. i cannot imagine that. and then go and kill six-year oldss. the guns did not make him do that. the guns were not evil. he is evil, his act is evil. we need to deal with what caused the problems. i don't think the guns caused it. host: back to your home state of georgia, james is on the phone on the independent line. caller: just a few things. georgia is last on the bottom of the education. you are doing nothing to he
sachs to buy from neutral. citing increased potential for yum's operations in china. although, that's what we talk about all the time. kfc in china. that's the growth in their, i think isn't yum bigger than mcdonald's in terms of total number? >> yeah. >> i think subway is, too. research -- >> they don't even call it kentucky tried anymore. >> kfc. >> and it's really chicken. >> that's uncalled for. what do you think it is, cat? that is uncalled for. >> this is all i'll say. >> tastes like chicken. >> yes, it's chicken! if david novak -- >> taco bell. >> yeah, taco bell. >> is that really meat? is that your next -- >> no. all right. the restaurant -- research in motion, rim shares coming off a seven-month high on news that the u.s. immigrations and customs enforcement agent are going to use the blackberry 10 on a trial basis. that is on news, did you see this, that the agency is going to ditch the iphone in favor -- >> okay, so why? >> i don't know. i just want to say, so blackberry was one of the sponsors of the thing yesterday, at the dealbook conference and they showed off the bl
to -- of china chance is progress to if there was one district name in changing the health and when people said the but the time from cover to,. it was a two session time. what they really meant was that they scanned it things they have read a yesterday. it was the reliable place to go. all of the news fit to print. it was a very important -- it was a very important part of history. let's take the normandy invasion in 1944, a major historic event. you remember -- most of us do not remember that, but if you think of that, could he should the map of the allies' progress? at the end of the thirties. horace. the crimes a point of departure, to make sure they have full reporters, that the most accurate news was really in the newspaper. the great news reporters could do so much. so it really was not the place for people to go to the news. i want to stress something else out. at that time, the government and the media were aligned. there was not this junction that we have now. it was not fox fees. there was not a gap that will come to later. i wanted to become the new media and administration was clos
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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